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JULY 24, 2014

Mounds and Priests, Cathedrals and Popes: Was Wickliffe a Native American Cathedral Town in AD 1250?

presented by Dr. Kit Wesler

Native Americans were building mounds in western Kentucky at the same time as Europeans were building cathedrals.

The Mississippian culture of the Mississippi Valley (AD 800-1400) is defined by sites like Wickliffe, in Ballard County, and Cahokia, Illinois, which shared a culture, a symbolic art, and religious architecture, which we recognize as mounds. Christian Europe can also be defined by a shared culture, symbolic art, and religious architecture (churches and cathedrals). Kit Wesler, professor of archaeology at Murray State University, will talk about his research on the archaeology of medieval cathedrals and Medieval Christendom and how he thinks that comparing Europe to the Mississippian culture is a challenge to typical archaeological thought.

Dr. Kit Wesler is Jesse D. Jones Endowed Professor of Geosciences at Murray State University. He has been studying the archaeology of western Kentucky, especially the Wickliffe Mounds site, for more than 30 years. He received his Bachelor’s degree in anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis, and his Master’s and Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He has conducted research in Eastern North America, West Africa, and Jamaica, and will take a sabbatical in Rome in Spring 2014.

July 24, 2014 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 119 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

UPCOMING PROGRAMS:

AUGUST 7, 2014

Breaking Down Barriers

As part of the 8th of August Emancipation Celebration, McCracken County Public Library, Hotel Metropolitan & The Kentucky Humanities Council will offer a Special Evenings Upstairs Event: Breaking Down Barriers

6:00-6:45pm

Join us in the library’s 2nd floor meeting room for a Meet & Greet with special guest, Dennis “Bose” Biddle, former Negro League Baseball pitcher.

Biddle was the youngest person to play in the Negro Baseball League. He played for the Chicago American Giants from 1953-1954. Biddle was known as “the man who beat the man.” Gerald (Lefty) McKinnis, one of the few pitchers to beat legend Satchel Paige, was out pitched by Biddle. Biddle is the author of Secrets of The Negro Leagues. (Sponsored by the Hotel Metropolitan)

7:00pm

Pee Wee Reese, Catalyst of Baseball Integration, will be portrayed by Dick Usher, retired educational psychology Professor Murray State University.

Reese led the Brooklyn Dodgers to 7 pennants and in 1955 a World Series win over the New York Yankees. Inducted into the Baseball of Fame in 1984, his plaque records the powerful example he set when Jackie Robinson joined the Dodgers in 1947 as the first black player. Reese’s acceptance and support of Robinson was instrumental in “breaking down baseball’s color barrier”.

Sponsored by McCracken Co. Public Library and The Kentucky Humanities Council

August 7, 2014 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 117 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

SEPTEMBER 18, 2014

Columbus Belmont -The Gibraltar of the West

Presented By Cindy Lynch, park manager

At one time, national leaders considered moving the country's capital from Washington to Columbus--a nod to Columbus-Belmont's important role in American history. The site was considered a strategic location for control of the Mississippi River, and the struggle to control the river led to the Battle of Belmont on November 7, 1861.

Confederate General Leonidas Polk established camps on both the Kentucky and Missouri sides of the river and named the more heavily fortified Columbus the "Gibraltar of the West." But a Union General destined for the White House, Ulysses S. Grant, outflanked the "Gibraltar" and forced evacuation of the Confederates in 1862.

Today, you can still see the massive chain and anchor used by the South to block passage of Union gunboats and the earthen trenches dug to protect over 19-thousand Confederate troops. The farmhouse that served as a Civil War hospital is now a museum that interprets many historic events at this site.

Cindy Lynch is the park manager at Columbus-Belmont State Park. She has been manager for 20 years, but has 38 years’ service. She is co-chair of the Civil War Days Committee, member of Friends of Columbus-Belmont Group and Hickman Co. Chamber of Commerce. Ms. Lynch is on the Board of Directors of Kentucky Western Waterlands and KY GRRO – the KY Great River Region Organization.

September 18, 2014 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 119 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net

OCTOBER 23, 2014

"Haint" Tales

Presented by Master Storyteller Octavia Sexton

A unique program of haunted stories & experiences to celebrate the season!

Literary great Loyal Jones says, "Octavia is one of our few, true folk artists and her performances are authentic representations of the tradition from which she comes."

Her natural dialect transports the listener into the Appalachian Mountains - where ’haints’ (ghosts) chill your blood, Jack tickles your funny bone, and the hills and hollers’ are full of surprises.

Inspired by the Appalachian art of storytelling the core of her stories is rooted in the traditions and lifestyles of her family and her past. Octavia Sexton grew up in the Appalachian tradition of storytelling and her stories are rooted in the fascinating history of her family. Her English/Irish ancestors migrated to Kentucky from Europe-bringing their stories with them. Her maternal and paternal great grandmothers were Cherokee storytellers from North Carolina. Octavia’s stories reflect the melding of these culturally different oral traditions.

Octavia attended a one room grade school in Eastern Kentucky; received a BA from Berea College in History/English Education; and completed graduate work in health education. She is a part of the Kentucky Arts Council’s Performing Arts on Tour Directory. Octavia has performed for more than 14 years and has done numerous art residencies. She is also a published author and has recorded several CDs of her stories.

October 23, 2014 | 7:00 pm | 2nd Floor meeting room
All programs are free and open to the public.

Connecting People, Cultures & Ideas
For more information, contact Bobbie Wrinkle
Tel: 270-442-2510 ext. 119 (Toll-free 866-829-7532)
Email: bwrinkle@mclib.net