August 2011 archive

*Deadline extended to win an autographed Wimpy Kid book!*

We have extended the deadline to submit your comic to win an autographed Diary of a Wimpy Kid book! Entries must now be submitted by Sunday, Oct.9.

Make sure to check out our cool events next week for Fall Break! You can view the schedule here.

Create-Your-Own Comic Strip Contest!

Win a Diary of a Wimpy Kid book signed by author Jeff Kinney!

You may use the template provided at the 2nd floor desk

 or make your own comic strip.

Multiple winners will be announced & displayed at the library!

The winning entries will be the funniest & most creative,

but don’t gross us out too much, please.

 

The contest is open to ages 17 and under.

Return your entry to the 2nd floor desk by Sept. 30, 2011.

For more information, contact Ashley

270-442-2510 ext. 122

aadair@mclib.net

*Click here for the link to the PDF so you can download the template from home!

More information on the books for our book club!

Our youth book club begins Sept. 17 at 1 pm. Click here for the original post. I wanted to describe the books a bit more, including Accelerated Reader information.

  

The first book we’ll be reading is Incarceron by Catherine Fisher. This is book 1 in the series (the 2nd book, Sapphique, is also available) and will be released as a movie in 2013. Taylor Lautner (Jacob from the Twilight movies) will be playing main character Finn.

Incarceron is a science fiction, dystopian novel that has been praised by critics, including School Library Journal, Publishers Weekly and Kirkus Reviews. Fans of The Hunger Games, Matched and The Maze Runner will enjoy this action-packed and suspenseful read.

Here’s the synopsis from the publisher:


Incarceron is a prison so vast that it contains not only cells and corridors, but metal forests, dilapidated cities, and wilderness. It has been sealed for centuries, and only one man has ever escaped. Finn has always been a prisoner here. Although he has no memory of his childhood, he is sure he came from Outside. His link to the Outside, his chance to break free, is Claudia, the warden’s daughter, herself determined to escape an arranged marriage. They are up against impossible odds, but one thing looms above all: Incarceron itself is alive…

Accelerated Reader lists Incarceron as a 4.6 reading level for grades 6 and up, and is worth 14.0 points.

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The next book we’ll be reading is The Invention of Hugo Cabret: A Novel in Words and Pictures by Brian Selznick, which won the Caldecott Medal in 2008. This book will also be released as a movie, entitled Hugo and directed by Martin Scorsese. It is due in theaters Nov. 23, 2011.

The New York Times cited The Invention of Hugo Cabret as “wonderful” and that “the result is a captivating work of fiction that young readers with a taste for complex plots and a touch of magic, think Harry H., not Harry P., can love.”

Here’s the synposis:

Orphan Hugo Cabret lives in a wall. His secret home is etched out in the crevices of a busy Paris train station. Part-time clock keeper, part-time thief, he leads a life of quiet routine until he gets involved with an eccentric, bookish young girl and an angry old man who runs a toy booth in the station. The Invention of Hugo Cabret unfolds its cryptic, magical story in a format that blends elements of picture book, novel, graphic novel, and film. Caldecott Honor-winning author-illustrator Brian Selznick has fashioned an intricate puzzle story that binds the reader like a mesmerist’s spell.

AR lists Hugo Cabret as a level 5.1 for middle grades (4-8), and is worth 4.0 points.

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In January and February we will be reading the winner of the 2011 Newbery Medal, Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool. This richly detailed novel is both a coming-of-age story and enjoyable historical fiction read.

The Kirkus Starred Review:

“When 12-year-old Abilene jumps off the train in Manifest, Kan., in 1936 to stay with her father’s boyhood friend, little does she know her sojourn will take her back, via mesmerizing tales, newspaper clippings, curious mementoes and World War I letters, to Manifest as it was in 1918—and into the life of the mysterious boy nicknamed Jinx. This young con man effected extraordinary change in the lives of the mostly immigrant residents and the fortunes of the mining town in that year. Abilene and readers get so caught up in the past in this richly detailed, splendidly written novel that they easily make the transition between the Depression and WWI eras and long to learn more about the town that once was. Readers will love guessing how Abilene’s dad fits into all the stories and townspeople’s memories. The absolute necessity of story as a way to redemption and healing past wounds is at the heart of this beautiful debut, and readers will cherish every word up to the heartbreaking yet hopeful and deeply gratifying ending.”

 

AR lists Moon Over Manifest at level 5.3 for middle grades (4-8) and 12.0 points.

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To celebrate the March 2012 release of The Hunger Games movie, we will be reading the book in February and March. If you are not already familiar with this exciting trilogy, come join the craze! And for those who’ve already read the series, meet with us to discuss the book and what you’re excited to see on the big screen.

AR cites The Hunger Games as a 5.3 level for middle grades plus (grades 6 and up) and is worth 15.0 points.

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The book for the Spring 2012 sessions has not yet been determined. I’d like to let YOU decide, so let me know your picks! Please contact me, Ashley, at 270-442-2510 ext. 122 or aadair@mclib.net if you have any questions or comments. I look forward to seeing you Sept. 17!

 

 

 

Book Club begins September 17!

      

Our youth book club will begin Saturday, Sept. 17 at 1 pm. We will meet 1 Saturday a month at 1 pm for 1 hour to read & discuss recent young adult books. Refreshments will be provided as well!

Here is the book lineup:

Sept. 17 & Oct. 15, 2011- Incarceron by Catherine Fisher (to be made into a movie for a 2013 release date!)

Oct. 15 & Nov. 12,  2011 – The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick (this Caldecott winner was made into a movie by Martin Scorsese, to be released Nov. 23, 2011)

Jan. 7 & Feb. 4, 2012 – Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool (2011 Newbery Award Winner)

Feb 4. & Mar. 3, 2012 – The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (the first movie in this exciting trilogy will be released Mar. 23, 2012)

March & April, 2012 – TBA (I’ll let YOU decide!)

I hope to see you next month, on Sept. 17 at 1 pm! 

Back to school books for juvenile fiction

Another school year is upon us, so I’ve gathered a list of back to school reads for juvenile fiction (grades 3-6). There’s something for everyone in these stories: humor, mystery, adventure and, most of all, important lessons about growing up.

The Reinvention of Bessica Lefter by Kristen Tracy 

Eleven-year-old Bessica’s plans to begin North Teton Middle School as a new person begin to fall apart even before school begins.

Okay, So Maybe I Do Have Superpowers (Dear Dumb Diary #11) by Jim Benton 

As their school gets ready for the annual Fun Fair, Jamie and Isabella agree to compete in the bottle toss game and to terrible consequences for the loser.

What’s Bugging Bailey Blecker? by Gail Donovan

When fifth-grader Bailey, who lives on an island off the coast of Maine, suffers a series of setbacks, including a lice outbreak at school, it will take every ounce of her determination and the help of new school friends to get everything back together.

The Vanishing Violin (Red Blazer Girls series) by Michael Beil 

Seventh-graders Sophie, Margaret, Rebecca, and Leigh Ann follow a trail of cryptic clues to locate a rare violin, catch the person sneaking into St. Veronica’s School for late-night cleaning and redecorating, and outsmart a conniving classmate.

School Days According to Humphrey by Betty G. Birney

Humphrey the hamster is puzzled when unfamiliar students fill Mrs. Brisbane’s classroom at summer’s end, but he soon learns that his friends from last year are fine and that the new class needs his special help.

Tales From a Not-So-Talented Pop Star (Dork Diaries #3) by Rachel Renee Russell

When scholarship student Nikki Maxwell, whose father is the school exterminator, decides to enter the talent show at her expensive private school, her nemesis MacKenzie threatens to reveal Nikki’s status to the rest of the school.

Drama Queen (Kylie Jean series) by Marci Peschke

It’s the start of a new school year, and Kylie Jean wants to play the Queen of Hearts in her second grade class’s production of Alice in Wonderland. She works on her lines with her family’s bull dog, Ugly Brother (whose real name is Bruno), until she memorizes every last one for the tryouts. Unfortunately, the new girl at school, Paula, sets her sights on the same role.

It’s the First Day of School – Forever! by R. L. Stine

Everything goes wrong for eleven-year-old Artie on his first day at Ardmore Middle School, from the moment his alarm goes off until the next morning, when everything is repeated exactly the same way.

I Thought We Were Friends (How I Survived Middle School series) by Nancy Krulik

It’s Career Day at school, and Jenny’s favorite aunt, the art director at a greeting card company, comes to speak. When her aunt takes interest in Jenny’s friend Liza’s artwork, Jenny is thrilled. But when her aunt wants to use Liza’s artwork for a new line of cards, Jenny suddenly finds herself feeling jealous of her friend! Jenny isn’t the only one who is green with envy. The Pops can’t believe that Liza is getting more attention than they are! Will Jenny stand by her friend, or will she succumb to her own jealousy, too?

Invisible Lines by Mary Amato

Coming from a poor, single-parent family, seventh-grader Trevor must rely on his intelligence, artistic ability, quick wit, and soccer prowess to win friends at his new Washington, D.C. school, but popular and rich Xander seems determined to cause him trouble.

Fourth Grade Fairy by Eileen Cook

When fairy-godmother-in-training Willow’s wish to attend a human school comes true, she finds getting along with humans to be harder than she expected, but her newly-acquired magical talent makes it easy to collaborate with animals.

The Lovely Shoes by Susan Shreve

In 1950s Ohio, ninth-grader Franny feels isolated and self-conscious at high school because of her deformed leg and feet, but her irrepressibly high-spirited mother is determined to find shoes for Franny to wear at the school dances.

Nikki and Deja: The Newsy News Newsletter by Karen English

When Nikki and her best friend, Deja, start a newsletter about what is happening on their street and in their school, they focus more on writing exciting stories than on finding the truth.

A Brand-New Me! by Henry Winkler and Lin Oliver

As he is preparing to attend middle school, Hank, who has learning differences and academic difficulties, gets an unexpected opportunity to audition for a performing arts school where his creativity and humor will be appreciated and nurtured.

The Dazzle Disaster Dinner Party (Sassy series) by Sharon M. Draper

Sassy Simone Sanford plans a fabulous dinner party for her fourth grade class, but it turns into a recipe for disaster when her dog eats the food, her friends make a mess, and the new girl in school is missing.