Archive of ‘futuristic’ category

More information on the books for our book club!

Our youth book club begins Sept. 17 at 1 pm. Click here for the original post. I wanted to describe the books a bit more, including Accelerated Reader information.

  

The first book we’ll be reading is Incarceron by Catherine Fisher. This is book 1 in the series (the 2nd book, Sapphique, is also available) and will be released as a movie in 2013. Taylor Lautner (Jacob from the Twilight movies) will be playing main character Finn.

Incarceron is a science fiction, dystopian novel that has been praised by critics, including School Library Journal, Publishers Weekly and Kirkus Reviews. Fans of The Hunger Games, Matched and The Maze Runner will enjoy this action-packed and suspenseful read.

Here’s the synopsis from the publisher:


Incarceron is a prison so vast that it contains not only cells and corridors, but metal forests, dilapidated cities, and wilderness. It has been sealed for centuries, and only one man has ever escaped. Finn has always been a prisoner here. Although he has no memory of his childhood, he is sure he came from Outside. His link to the Outside, his chance to break free, is Claudia, the warden’s daughter, herself determined to escape an arranged marriage. They are up against impossible odds, but one thing looms above all: Incarceron itself is alive…

Accelerated Reader lists Incarceron as a 4.6 reading level for grades 6 and up, and is worth 14.0 points.

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The next book we’ll be reading is The Invention of Hugo Cabret: A Novel in Words and Pictures by Brian Selznick, which won the Caldecott Medal in 2008. This book will also be released as a movie, entitled Hugo and directed by Martin Scorsese. It is due in theaters Nov. 23, 2011.

The New York Times cited The Invention of Hugo Cabret as “wonderful” and that “the result is a captivating work of fiction that young readers with a taste for complex plots and a touch of magic, think Harry H., not Harry P., can love.”

Here’s the synposis:

Orphan Hugo Cabret lives in a wall. His secret home is etched out in the crevices of a busy Paris train station. Part-time clock keeper, part-time thief, he leads a life of quiet routine until he gets involved with an eccentric, bookish young girl and an angry old man who runs a toy booth in the station. The Invention of Hugo Cabret unfolds its cryptic, magical story in a format that blends elements of picture book, novel, graphic novel, and film. Caldecott Honor-winning author-illustrator Brian Selznick has fashioned an intricate puzzle story that binds the reader like a mesmerist’s spell.

AR lists Hugo Cabret as a level 5.1 for middle grades (4-8), and is worth 4.0 points.

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In January and February we will be reading the winner of the 2011 Newbery Medal, Moon Over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool. This richly detailed novel is both a coming-of-age story and enjoyable historical fiction read.

The Kirkus Starred Review:

“When 12-year-old Abilene jumps off the train in Manifest, Kan., in 1936 to stay with her father’s boyhood friend, little does she know her sojourn will take her back, via mesmerizing tales, newspaper clippings, curious mementoes and World War I letters, to Manifest as it was in 1918—and into the life of the mysterious boy nicknamed Jinx. This young con man effected extraordinary change in the lives of the mostly immigrant residents and the fortunes of the mining town in that year. Abilene and readers get so caught up in the past in this richly detailed, splendidly written novel that they easily make the transition between the Depression and WWI eras and long to learn more about the town that once was. Readers will love guessing how Abilene’s dad fits into all the stories and townspeople’s memories. The absolute necessity of story as a way to redemption and healing past wounds is at the heart of this beautiful debut, and readers will cherish every word up to the heartbreaking yet hopeful and deeply gratifying ending.”

 

AR lists Moon Over Manifest at level 5.3 for middle grades (4-8) and 12.0 points.

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To celebrate the March 2012 release of The Hunger Games movie, we will be reading the book in February and March. If you are not already familiar with this exciting trilogy, come join the craze! And for those who’ve already read the series, meet with us to discuss the book and what you’re excited to see on the big screen.

AR cites The Hunger Games as a 5.3 level for middle grades plus (grades 6 and up) and is worth 15.0 points.

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The book for the Spring 2012 sessions has not yet been determined. I’d like to let YOU decide, so let me know your picks! Please contact me, Ashley, at 270-442-2510 ext. 122 or aadair@mclib.net if you have any questions or comments. I look forward to seeing you Sept. 17!

 

 

 

It’s a Bleak New World

Move over Edward Cullen, dark and dreary vampire novels seem to have been (mostly) replaced by dark and dreary dystopian/science fiction novels for teens. With the success of series like the Hunger Games, the most popular new books for teens all seem to have dismal premises. Whether in a society run by a government that cures people of the delirium of love or speeding through the universe on a spaceship filled with cryogenically frozen people, the most exciting novels this year are all about rebelling against the oppressive authority.

Here’s a list of some of our favorites, both old and new:

Across the Universe by Beth Revis

Teenaged Amy, a cryogenically frozen passenger on the spaceship Godspeed, wakes up to discover that someone may have tried to murder her.

The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary E. Pearson

In the not-too-distant future, when biotechnological advances have made synthetic bodies and brains possible but illegal, a seventeen-year-old girl, recovering from a serious accident and suffering from memory lapses, learns a startling secret about her existence.

Birthmarked by Caragh M. O’Brien

In a future world baked dry by the sun and divided into those who live inside the wall and those who live outside it, sixteen-year-old midwife Gaia Stone is forced into a difficult choice when her parents are arrested and taken into the city.

The Compound by S.A. Bodeen

After his parents, two sisters, and he have spent six years in a vast underground compound built by his wealthy father to protect them from a nuclear holocaust, fifteen-year-old Eli, whose twin brother and grandmother were left behind, discovers that his father has perpetrated a monstrous hoax on them all.

The Declaration by Gemma Malley

In 2140 England, where drugs enable people to live forever and children are illegal, teenaged Anna, an obedient “Surplus” training to become a house servant, discovers that her birth parents are trying to find her.

Delirium by Lauren Oliver

Lena looks forward to receiving the government-mandated cure that prevents the delirium of love and leads to a safe, predictable, and happy life, until ninety-five days before her eighteenth birthday and her treatment, she falls in love.

Feed by M.T. Anderson

In a future where most people have computer implants in their heads to control their environment, a boy meets an unusual girl who is in serious trouble.

Gone by Michael Grant

In a small town on the coast of California, everyone over the age of fourteen suddenly disappears, setting up a battle between the remaining town residents and the students from a local private school, as well as those who have “The Power” and are able to perform supernatural feats and those who do not.

Incarceron by Catherine Fisher

To free herself from an upcoming arranged marriage, Claudia, the daughter of the Warden of Incarceron, a futuristic prison with a mind of its own, decides to help a young prisoner escape.

Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Through journal entries sixteen-year-old Miranda describes her family’s struggle to survive after a meteor hits the moon, causing worldwide tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions.

Matched by Ally Condie

All her life, Cassia has never had a choice. The Society dictates everything: when and how to play, where to work, where to live, what to eat and wear, when to die, and most importantly to Cassia as she turns 17, who to marry. When she is Matched with her best friend Xander, things couldn’t be more perfect. But why did her neighbor Ky’s face show up on her match disk as well?

The Maze Runner by James Dashner

Sixteen-year-old Thomas wakes up with no memory in the middle of a maze and realizes he must work with the community in which he finds himself if he is to escape.

Sharp North by Patrick Cave

In a futuristic world, Great Families rule Britain through a caste system where reproduction is seriously restricted, while the families keep illegal clones or “spares” of themselves.

Ship Breaker by Paolo Bacigalupi

In a futuristic world, teenaged Nailer scavenges copper wiring from grounded oil tankers for a living, but when he finds a beached clipper ship with a girl in the wreckage, he has to decide if he should strip the ship for its wealth or rescue the girl.

Those That Wake by Jesse Karp

New York City, once vibrant and alive, has lost its spirit. People walk the streets with their heads down and their eyes averted, withdrawing from each other and into the cold comfort of technology. Teenagers Mal and Laura have grown up in this new reality: Mal in the city, part of the foster care system; Laura in the suburbs, loved and protected. They’ve never met. Seemingly, they never will. But then their worlds shift. On the same day Mal learns his estranged brother has disappeared, Laura discovers her parents have inexplicably forgotten her. Both begin a search for their families that leads them to the same terrifying truth: someone or something has wiped the two teenagers from the memories of every single person they have ever known. Thrown together, Mal and Laura must find common ground if they are going to reclaim a past that was stolen from them–and create a future no one can take away…

The Unidentified by Rae Mariz

In a futuristic alternative school set in a shopping mall where video game-playing students are observed and used by corporate sponsors for market research, Katey “Kid” Dade struggles to figure out where she fits in and whether she even wants to.

Unwind by Neal Shusterman

In a future world where those between the ages of thirteen and eighteen can have their lives “unwound” and their body parts harvested for use by others, three teens go to extreme lengths to uphold their beliefs–and, perhaps, save their own lives.

Wither by Lauren DeStefano

After modern science turns every human into a genetic time bomb with men dying at age twenty-five and women dying at age twenty, girls are kidnapped and married off in order to repopulate the world.

*Note that many of these are part of a series, so check out each book at the library!